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$13,000 in Debit Card Fraud

$13,000 in Debit Card Fraud
Okay, I’ll start by telling you never make your phone password 1111, 2222, 3333, Etc. with the amount and type of information we store in our phones these days. I use FaceTime, but it doesn’t always work for multiple reasons, face being covered etc., so for the easiest, quickest password for this rare occasion for me was 33333. Not smart.
(First 3 paragraphs are the backstory, skip to the 4th to get to the nitty and gritty. Backstory TL;DR I lost one of my phones, thinking It was somewhere at home or accidentally thrown away, wasn’t too worried about it.)
Okay, I am at the end of my wits and starting to get extremely frustrated at the run around I’m receiving. I have 2 phones and i hate it and have been thinking about getting rid of one of them. The day after Christmas after after multiple family stops the day before and really, what I call, chaos, I realize I can’t find one of my phones. I check find my IPhone and it is offline. Not stressed at the moment, just figured it’s around the house somewhere buried under some wrapping paper somewhere who knows, It’ll show up eventually, plus I finally only have one phone and I kind of enjoy it.
So I leave the next day for our yearly trip to Florida. Still couldn’t find my phone, but didn’t search to hard to be honest. Gone till the 6th. Only find out one problem. My bank account is under the number that I lost, so with 2FA, I can’t access my bank account without that number, still not a big deal, not freaking out. Now I have a few days to find this phone when I get home before I leave on the 9th for another week long trip, but I’m thinking it’s gonna take me 5 min. Get home catch up up some sleep. Tear the house apart, not there. I mean I looked everywhere. Well, Time to leave again. Confused as all hell, but still not that worried. I made plenty of deposits in my bank account and have another at another bank so I’m not needing to check my bank account at all as I know I’m good. Still not stressing it I leave and will finally get it all sorted out when I get home. Not knowing what cluster fuck I had in store for me I had planned on leaving again on the 18th for 4 days and the 24th till the end of January.
Get home. Go to every place I had went on Christmas, even after having them all look, figured I’d look again. Now I’m leaving thinking it must just have been thrown away with all the trash from Christmas and when I get back I’ll just cancel that number, call the bank to switch numbers, and call and switch over all the other accounts I have tied to that number and change them to the new number. Which is quite a few. Probably why I have been putting it off for so long. Finally decide I’m gonna stick with 2 numbers. Just going to get me a new phone with the same number when I get home and we’re all good.
Okay that’s the backstory of how it took me so long to notice what had been happening to me the whole time. Now to the good stuff. Get my number back. Everything’s good right? Wrong. I go to log into my bank account and the number and email address are changed. I immediately contact the bank to let them know and cancel my debit card and credit cards and tell them everything that has happened, also find out there had been $13,368 in fraudulent charges on my debit card, which I had in my possession the entire time. After reporting the fraudulent charges to capital one, they said they would investigate, I had also emailed the company to let them know of the charges and requested documents on all of the charges and told them I would be more than willing to help in anyway I can or give them any documents they would need to help with the investigations. I told Capital One the same thing. As I wait on a reply through my own investigation.
I had recognized the company that my card was charged to as one that I used to buy cryptocurrency through an exchange that I had previously used called KuCoin. So I did my own research turns out my phone didn’t get thrown away because the only way this could have happened is if someone had found my phone. I have all my account info for everything along with my debit card and credit card numbers, CVC, I mean everything, stored on my phone in documents in the cloud. So they got on the crypto exchange, the only one, that doesn’t have a delayed withdrawal time, or a KYC and 2FA set up (I set it up just to try it out, didn’t do much with it, and went back to Coinbase and Binance) and used my card info to send bitcoin to my account on KuCoin after changing the email and number, and immediately withdrew every deposit as soon as they got it. On Blockchain.com, you can see they were all sent to the same exact wallet, and from that wallet to a few others. They also put money on someone’s account through inmatesales.com with my debit card, so I’m assuming one of their buddies could get some nutty bars, fresh undies, and a phone call or something. I have never previously used this website.
4 Days later I recieved an email from Capital one saying they have concluded their investigation and denied my claim. 4 Days is pretty quick, at least I think as I have never had a fraudulent charge or disputed any charge on any of my accounts, ever, in my life so I don’t know the process. They never asked for any documentation to support my claim, when I started to ask questions and seek information into their investigation they told me I could request a document on how they reached their decision and would not discuss the matter any further. Any question I asked regrading the dispute was answered with “we will not discuss this matter any further”. Literally any question I had was answered with that line. What pisses me off the most was after I told them that all my information was at risk that along with new card number, I would also like to change my account numbers; which were obviously compromised as well. They told me they wouldn’t do that. Wtf. Guess I’ll just close my account then.
Basically what I’m asking is what is the process to getting my money back? Their reasons for denying my claim is that the CVC number was used, I’ve had previous business with the company, SMS confirmation (don’t know what number they are talking about, but either way, I wasn’t in possession of my number, and they changed the number on my account, and the last reason was that my story doesn’t match account or login records (I was never able to log into my account through the entire month due to 2FA security). There’s no way that my story doesn’t match the records because it is what happened and the truth is the truth and facts are facts.
Am I going to have to hire a lawyer and take them to court? If it wasn’t this much money I’d just say screw it and eat my losses and move on but now I’m pissed and it’s about principle now. Am I pretty much screwed at this point?? Let it be known this is only with my capital one account. Which isn’t the only account they were able to get into. They got into my TD Ameritrade account and my fifth third account, both with debit cards. Help me please. I know it might seem like I have enough money to be able to make it through this, but I don’t. I’m actually broke and just barely making it by, and that $13,000 was the most money I’ve ever had in my bank account. :( I’m scared. Please help.
TL:DR. I Lost my phone and the person who found my phone got into all my accounts and swindled me out of $20k.
submitted by checkingoffthelist to legaladvice [link] [comments]

My attempt at an ELI5 for cryptocurrency to help my friends.

This is a long one so fair warning and no there is no tl;dr. I've only been at this for about 6 months and worked up this paper the other day for my friends who are interested but know very little about this. Hopefully whoever reads this can make in corrections as I am far from an expert.
Blockchain
Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin, Ether are all blockchains. Blockchains are basically a spreadsheet (LEDGER) that is duplicated multiple times across a network and updated regularly simultaneously. There is no centralized version of this ledger. It is hosted simultaneously by thousands/millions of computers. These ledgers will update on their own, Bitcoin as an example automatically checks itself every 10 minutes. Each of these 10-minute increment of transactions (in bitcoins case transactions would be sending or receiving bitcoins from one person to another for goods or services) are called BLOCKS. For these blocks to be confirmed, accepted, and updated to the ledger nodes are required.
Nodes (Mining/Forging)
A node is a computer running the blockchain software on the network. The blockchain software will automatically download the entire ledger of all transactions since its inception. At regular intervals, the software will take the transactions of a block (data on the ledger) and convert them into a mathematical puzzle to be solved by randomly chosen nodes (MINING). Mining requires powerful processors (typically GPUs) and substantial quantities of energy to receive mined tokens profitably. When a specific number of nodes solve the puzzle with the same answer they are basically confirming that the data on the block is accurate as multiple independent nodes found the same answer. When confirmed, the block gets added to the previous blocks making a chain of blocks aka a blockchain. As an incentive to run your computer as a node you are rewarded with TOKENS. If a single person or group of people wanted to manipulate the ledger, the amount of machinery and electricity used to achieve the majority of miners thus allowing you to manipulate the ledger is so exponentially expensive that it serves no reasonable purpose. This is an example of a Proof of Work Blockchain System (computer solves puzzle and rewarded with tokens)
Tokens
Tokens are part of the core of the blockchain. They are an incentive to validate transactions and create blocks. They gain intrinsic value based on the blockchain they are associated with. Some blockchains grant token holder’s different abilities. With Bitcoin, tokens are needed to pay for transaction fees. Others allow voting rights on how certain blockchain functions are managed. There is a limited amount of Bitcoin that will ever be released to nodes (21 million expected to be all be released by 2033) which also keep inflation from being a problem. Blockchains can create their platform with whatever number of tokens they would like and release them or create means to mine them as they see fit. Essentially, as with any other fiat money (currency that a government has declared to be legal tender NOT backed by a physical commodity), as adoption and trust increases the value of the token will increase. If most people accept Bitcoin for services and stores accept Bitcoin for goods than it is as good as the next currency.
Wallets
Whether you mine for tokens, are paid in tokens for goods or services or purchase tokens from a person or currency exchange you need a place to store them securely and a way to send and receive them. Cryptocurrency Wallets don’t store currency, they hold your public and private keys that interface with the blockchain so you can access your balance, send money and manage your funds. The public key allows others to send money to the public key only. A wallet that is "offline" (see Hardware or Paper below) cannot access funds or send money unless it is accessed with another form of wallet, either desktop, online, or mobile.
1) Desktop Wallet - Installed on your computer and are only accessible from that SINGLE computer. Very secure but if someone hacks your computer you are exposed. 2) Online Wallet - Run remotely (cloud based) and are far more convenient to access but make them more vulnerable as they are controlled by a third party and are also vulnerable to hacking attacks. Exchange wallets are online wallets but you are not in control of the private key. View it as a wallet that is lended to you so you can trade. The wallet is technically not yours. 3) Mobile - Ran on an app and are useful as they can be used anywhere including retail stores 4) Hardware - Private keys are stored on a tangible device like a USB drive. They can make transactions online but they are stored offline. Compatible with web interfaces and support many but not all currencies. To use, plug into a computer, enter a pin, send currency and confirm. Safest form of storage. 5) Paper - Basically a physical printout of your private and public keys. It is not stored online anywhere and the only way transactions can happen is if you transfer money with the help of an Online wallet.
Example of a Public Key = 1A684DbsHQKPVCWgaUsYdF4uQGwTiA9BFT Example of a Private Key = E9873D79C6D87DC0FB6A5778633389F4453213303DA61F20BD67FC233AA33262
Most wallets provide a Recovery Mnemonic Passcode that is a series of words (typically 12 to 24 words) in a specific order. If you lose your login information for your wallet you can supply the mnemonic passcode and retrieve your lost login information. If you lose your login information and your mnemonic passcode your wallet will be inaccessible and your tokens are lost to you. The above basically describes a first generation Blockchain Cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin. It is used basically as currency with no centralized entity regulating the release of additional currency and keeping the ledger of where the money is going secure and extremely safe from manipulation.
Second Generation Blockchain
The second generation blockchains sprung out of this environment with something more valuable. Utilizing the blockchain system to allow applications to be ran on top of a decentralized secure system. Instead of just recording transactions, contracts could be transmitted the same way. More complex transactions (SMART CONTRACTS) allow for things such as: - Funds to be spent only when a required percentage of people agree - Manage agreements between users (such as insurance) - Provide utility to other contracts - Store information about an application such as domain registration information or membership records This basically can allow applications to be ran on top of the blockchain system. This can cut out the middleman for many real-world applications (mortgages, banking, communications, security confirmations etc.)
Proof of Work/Proof of Stake
As I mentioned earlier, Proof of Work (PoW) requires nodes to solve a mathematical puzzle which is rewarded with tokens. Proof of Stake (PoS) is different, the tokens with proof of stake systems are pre-mined meaning they are all created when the blockchain system is created. Blocks are not verified by the typical method. The block validator uses the blockchain software to stake their tokens and are chosen based on specific factors depending on how many tokens the person holds and for how long. Depending on how many tokens they hold will restrict the quantity of blocks they can validate. If they own more they can validate more often but all validators will be chosen randomly keeping the rewards fairly distributed (unlike PoW which typically reward the first completed.) The blockchain still requires a mathematical puzzle to be solved but it is much easier than PoW requiring far less time and energy. If the blockchain has premined all of their tokens then new tokens cannot be mined for rewards in PoS. The reward for staking your tokens to be a validator is a portion of the transaction fee that is charged as part of normal transactions on the blockchain. That is why PoS miners are called forgers. If manipulation is attempted than their stake can be taken from their wallet adding more motivation to prevent data manipulation.
Fork
Some cryptocurrencies may need to update or upgrade the coding of their blockchain software. When this happens usually a fork occurs. This basically means the cryptocurrency splits into two separate cryptocurrencies. Because the nature of blockchain technology, they are decentralized and autonomous so the older version cannot be deleted or removed. If people choose to continue using the old version they can. For mining/forging purposes the nodes will need to choose which they will mine/forge and download the blockchain software on their computer to proceed. When the fork occurs, anyone holding tokens in the original currency will be given the same number of tokens in the forked currency. (When Bitcoin forked to Bitcoin Cash, anyone holding x amount of Bitcoin would receive a new wallet for Bitcoin Cash also containing x amount of Bitcoin Cash.) This is called a Hard Fork and all previous transactions are made invalid. There are also Soft Forks, in this case it is backwards compatible and all previous transactions are valid. This can result in two currencies but in most cases, it doesn’t as it is usually accepted by most miners/forgers because it is backwards compatible.
Exchanges
Online currency exchanges allow you to buy, sell or exchange fiat money (USD, EUR, etc) with digital currencies or in most cases digital currencies for other digital currencies. There are a large variety of different exchanges that are operated in multiple countries but there are around a dozen that the majority of cryptocurrency trading volume are present on. Not all cryptocurrencies will be listed on all exchanges, some have specific prerequisites to be listed on their exchange and there may be fees associated as well. Once your account is set up you will have a list of all available cryptocurrencies to trade. Each currency will have an associated online wallet with the public key address allowing you to send that specific currency to that wallet. (Many exchanges are having delayed or canceled identity verification, currency transfers and lack sufficient customer support due to the influx of new traders) Examples of top exchanges: 1) Coinbase (trades fiat) 2) GDAX (trades fiat) 3) Gemini (trades fiat) 4) Changelly (trades fiat) 5) Bittrex 6) Binance 7) HitBTC 8) EtherDelta 9) Bitfinex 10) Kraken 11) Bithumb 12) Bitstamp 13) Poloniex 14) OKEx
Sending/Receiving Tokens
All wallets have the ability to send digital currency to other wallets. The function is relatively easy, make sure the currency you are sending is going to the appropriate wallet for that currency. Ethereum tokens cannot be sent to a Bitcoin wallet for example. (The tokens aren’t actually moving location; the list of transactions/ownership is what is stored in the wallet). Triple check the wallet private key you are sending the tokens to. If you type the wrong address the tokens will be lost in nearly all incidents. Some mobile wallets allow you to scan a QR code that will automatically enter the public key rather than copying/pasting or typing out the public key.
Taxes
As of January 1, 2018 it appears that taxing on digital currency has changed. Every trade between any digital currencies (Bitcoin to Ether, Ether to Litecoin etc) will be a taxable transaction. If you hold the currency for longer than one year than you will pay capital gain tax when it is traded or sold (15%-20%) and if you sell or trade in less than a year you will have to add the profit to your taxable income to adjust your tax bracket.
Altcoins
Altcoins are basically any coin that is not Bitcoin. Most cryptocurrencies do not have a native blockchain (their own independent dedicated blockchain). Bitcoin, Ether, Ripple, Waves, NXT, Cardano all have their own native blockchain. Many other cryptocurrencies run on other cryptocurrency’s blockchains. Litecoin runs on Bitcoins blockchain, hundreds run on the Ethereum blockchain. These currencies act as smart contracts running on the adopted blockchain.
DApps (Decentralized Applications)
For a blockchain application to be considered a DApp it must be 1) Open source, code available to all 2) Decentralized, uses blockchain cryptographic tech 3) Incentive, must have tokens to fuel itself 4) Algorithm/Protocol, generates tokens and has a built-in consensus mechanism (mining/forging.)
There are 3 types of DApps, each basically piggybacks off the platform of the previous Type 1 – Have their own blockchain (like bitcoin) Type 2 – Use the blockchain of Type 1 DApps Type 3 – Use the protocol of Type 2 DApps
ICO (Initial Coin Offering)
Much like an IPO (Initial Public Offering) that offers stock in a private company to the public, an ICO raises money for new Cryptocurrency ventures. Typically, a minimum investment is required in the form of a cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin or Ether and the investor is given tokens of the cryptocurrency at a reduced cost. Due to the fact that ICO’s are so new, government agencies have not begun regulating these ventures making them extremely risky as anyone with a competent coder can create and market a cryptocurrency that can be used to swindle investors who aren’t cautious. The US government no longer allows its citizens to participate in ICO’s and if you are using a computer with an IP address located in the United States, ICO’s websites will not allow you to invest.
Research
1) Whitepapers – Each cryptocurrency will have their own dedicated websites and most will have a whitepaper that has a description of what their cryptocurrency is designed to do. 2) Roadmaps – Also on each cryptocurrency’s website, they tend to have a roadmap or timeline as to when they are planning to complete certain milestones be it added features to the blockchain or wallet or any other important events. 3) Coinmarketcap.com – List of every available cryptocurrency, the exchanges they trade on, market cap, trade volume, available tokens, newly created tokens etc. 4) Reddit.com (cryptocurrency subreddit) – Subreddits focused on cryptocurrency as well as specific subreddits focused on individual cryptocurrencies. Be cautious as many people on these sites are uninformed and/or are trying to manipulate the market by fooling others to buy or sell based on fraudulent information. 5) Bitcointalk.org – Forums specific to individual cryptocurrencies. There is a lot of self-marketing (bounties) on this site. Take what they say with a grain of salt 6) TwitteFacebook (Social Media) – Many times news from team members or the cryptocurrency’s social media page will break news before it is listed on any of the above-mentioned outlets. Find out who is working for the cryptocurrency you are interested in and start following the team’s social media. Don’t forget to look at their linkedin accounts if available, previous employment and behavioral history to confirm they are competent. 7) Github - Code from projects can be uploaded here and reviewed for issues and revisions.
Common Terms/Slang
Shilling – covert advertising, personally endorsing a token so as to manipulate the price to either recoup a loss or increase gains on a token the individual owns. FUD – Fear, Uncertainty, Doubt; another method to manipulate the price of a token the person owns by making others second guess their investment decision on a specific token. FOMO – Fear Of Missing Out; buying a token (usually after the price has already increased) hoping they haven’t missed the majority of a price increase. Shitcoin – A cryptocurrency that has become worthless overtime or a scam operation. To the Moon – Massive increase in a token’s price.
I'm sure there are probably revisions to be done on this as I am still getting my head around all of the concepts. Any help to this would be appreciated.
submitted by Truantlife to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Blockchain Wallets

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What a Blockchain Wallet is? What is its purpose?
Find the answer after reading this article.
Public/Private Key
The public key is the digital code you give to someone that wants to transfer ownership of a unit of cryptocurrency to you; and a private key is what you need to be able to unlock your own wallet to transfer a unit of a cryptocurrency to someone else. The encoding of information within a wallet is done by the private and public keys. That is the main component of the encryption that maintains the security of the wallet. Both keys function in simultaneous encryption systems called symmetric and asymmetric encryption. The former, alternatively known as private key encryption, makes use of the same key for encryption and decryption. The latter, asymmetric encryption, utilizes two keys, the public and private key, wherein a message-sender encrypts the message with the public key, and the recipient decodes it with their private key. The public key uses asymmetric algorithms that convert messages into an unreadable format. A person who possesses a public key can encrypt the message for a specific receiver.
Accessing wallets
Methods of wallet access vary depending on the type of wallet being used. Various types of currency wallets on an exchange will normally be accessed via the exchange’s entrance portal, normally involving a combination of a username/password and optionally, 2FA (Two factor authentication, which we explain in more detail later). Whereas hardware wallets need to be connected to an internet enabled device, and then have a pin code entered manually by the user in possession of the hardware wallet in order for access to be gained. Phone wallets are accessed through the device on which the wallet application has been downloaded. Ordinarily, a passcode and/or security pattern must be entered before entry is granted, in addition to 2FA for withdrawals.
Satoshi Nakamoto built the Satoshi client which evolved into Bitcoin in 2009. This software allowed users to create wallets and send money to other addresses. However, it proved to be a nightmarish user experience, with many transactions being sent to incorrect addresses and private keys being lost. The MtGox (Magic the Gathering Online exchange, named after the original intended use of the exchange) incident, which will be covered in greater detail later, serves as a reminder of the dangers present in the cryptosphere regarding security, and the need to constantly upgrade your defenses against all potential hacks. The resulting loss of 850k BTC is a still unresolved problem, weighing heavily on the victims and the markets at large. This caused a huge push for a constantly evolving and improving focus on security. Exchanges that developed later, and are thus considered more legitimate and secure, such as Gemini and Coinbase, put a much greater emphasis on vigilance as a direct result of the MtGox hacking incident. We also saw the evolution of wallet security into the physical realm with the creation of hardware wallets, most notable among them the Ledger and Trezor wallets.
Types of Wallets & Storage Methods
The simplest way to sift through the dozens of cryptocurrency storage methods available today, is to divide them up into digital and non-digital, software and hardware wallets. There are also less commonly used methods of storage of private keys, like paper wallets and brain wallets. We will examine them all at least briefly, because in the course of your interaction with cryptocurrencies and Blockchain technology, it is essential to master all the different types of hardware and software wallets. Another distinction must be made between hot wallets and cold wallets. A hot wallet is one that is connected to the internet, and a cold wallet is one that is not. Fun fact: The level below cold storage, deep cold storage has just recently been implemented by the Regal RA DMCC, a subsidiary of an internationally renowned gold trading company licensed in the Middle East. After having been granted a crypto trading license, Regal RA launched their “deep cold” storage solution for traders and investors, which offers the ability to store crypto assets in vaults deep below the Almas Tower in Dubai. This storage method is so secure that at no point is the vault connected to a network or the internet; meaning the owners of the assets can be sure that the private keys are known only to the rightful owners.
Lets take a quick look at specific features and functionality of varieties of crypto wallets. Software wallets: wallet applications installed on a laptop, desktop, phone or tablet. Web Wallets: A hot wallet by definition. Web Wallets are accessible through the web browser on your phone or computer. The most important feature to recognize about any kind of web wallet, is that the private keys are held and managed by a trusted third party. MyEtherWallet is the most commonly used non-exchange web wallet, but it can only be used to store Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens.
Though the avenue of access to MEW is through the web, it is not strictly speaking a web wallet, though this label will suffice for the time being. The MEW site gives you the ability to create a new wallet so you can store your ETH yourself. All the data is created and stored on your CPU rather than their servers. This makes MEW a hybrid kind of web wallet and desktop wallet. Exchange Wallets: A form of Web Wallet contained within an exchange. An exchange will hold a wallet for each individual variety of cryptocurrency you hold on that exchange. Desktop Wallets: A software program downloaded onto your computer or tablet hard drive that usually holds only one kind of cryptocurrency. The Nano Wallet (Formerly Raiwallet) and Neon wallet for storage of NEO and NEP-5 tokens are notable examples of desktop wallets Phone Wallets: These are apps downloaded onto a mobile phone that function in the same manner as a desktop wallet, but actually can hold many different kinds of cryptocurrency. The Eidoo Wallet for storing Ethereum and its associated tokens and Blockchain Wallet which currently is configured to hold BTC, ETH and Bitcoin Cash, are some of the most widely used examples.
Hardware wallets — LedgeTrezoAlternatives
Hardware wallets are basically physical pathways and keys to the unique location of your crypto assets on the Blockchain. These are thought to be more secure than any variety of web wallet because the private key is stored within your own hard wallet, an actual physical device. This forcibly removes the risk your online wallet, or your exchange counter party, might be hacked in the same manner as MtGox. In hardware wallet transactions, the wallet’s API creates the transaction when a user requests a payment. An API is a set of functions that facilitates the creation of applications that interact and access features or data of an operating system. The hardware then signs the transaction, and produces a public key, which is given to the network. This means the signing keys never leave the hardware wallet. The user must both enter a personal identification number and physically press buttons on the hardware wallet in order to gain access to their Blockchain wallet address through this method, and do the same to initiate transfers.
Paper Wallets
Possibly the safest form of cryptocurrency storage in terms of avoiding hacking, Paper Wallets are an offline form of crypto storage that is free to set up, and probably the most secure way for users, from beginners to experts, to hold on to their crypto assets. To say it simply, paper wallets are an offline cold storage method of storing cryptocurrency. This includes actually printing out your public and private keys on a piece of paper, which you then store and save in a secure place. The keys are printed in the form of QR codes which you can scan in the future for all your transactions. The reason why it is so safe is that it gives complete control to you, the user. You do not need to worry about the security or condition of a piece of hardware, nor do you have to worry about hackers on the net, or any other piece of malware. You just need to take care of one piece of paper!
Real World Historical Examples of Different Wallet Types
Web Wallet: Blockchain.info Brief mechanism & Security Blockchain.info is both a cryptocurrency wallet, supporting Bitcoin, Ethereum and Bitcoin cash, and also a block explorer service. The wallet service provided by blockchain.info has both a Web Wallet, and mobile phone application wallet, both of which involve signing up with an email address, and both have downloadable private keys. Two Factor Authentication is enabled for transfers from the web and mobile wallets, as well as email confirmation (as with most withdrawals from exchanges). Phone Wallet: Eidoo The Eidoo wallet is a multi-currency mobile phone app wallet for storage of Ethereum and ERC-20 tokens. The security level is the standard phone wallet level of email registration, confirmation, password login, and 2 factor authentication used in all transfers out. You may find small volumes of different varieties of cryptocurrencies randomly turning up in your Eidoo wallet address. Certain projects have deals with individual wallets to allow for “airdrops” to take place of a particular token into the wallet, without the consent of the wallet holder. There is no need to be alarmed, and the security of the wallet is not in any way compromised by these airdrops.
Neon Wallet
The NEON wallet sets the standard for web wallets in terms of security and user-friendly functionality. This wallet is only designed for storing NEO, Gas, and NEP-5 tokens (Ontology, Deep Brain Chain, RPX etc.). As with all single-currency wallets, be forewarned, if you send the wrong cryptocurrency type to a wallet for which it is not designed, you will probably lose your tokens or coins. MyEtherWallet My Ether Wallet, often referred to as MEW, is the most widely used and highly regarded wallet for Ethereum and its related ERC-20 tokens. You can access your MEW account with a hardware wallet, or a different program. Or you can also get access by typing or copying in your private key. However, you should understand this method is the least safe way possible,and therefore is the most likely to result in a hack. Hardware: TrezoLedger Brief History Mechanism and Security A hardware wallet is a physical key to your on-chain wallet location, with the private keys contained within a secure sector of the device. Your private key never leaves your hardware wallet. This is one of the safest possible methods of access to your crypto assets. Many people feel like the hardware wallet strikes the right balance between security, peace of mind, and convenience. Paper Wallet Paper wallets can be generated at various websites, such as https://bitcoinpaperwallet.com/ and https://walletgenerator.net/. They enable wallet holders to store their private keys totally offline, in as secure a manner as is possible.
Real World Example — Poor Practices
MtGox Hack history effects and security considerations MtGox was the largest cryptocurrency exchange in the world before it was hacked in 2014. They were handling over 70% of BTC transactions before they were forced to liquidate their business. The biggest theft of cryptocurrency in history began when the private keys for the hot wallets were stolen in 2011 from a wallet.dat file, possibly by hacking, possibly by a rogue employee. Over the course of the next 3 years the hot wallets were emptied of approximately 650000 BTC. The hacker only needed wallet.dat file to access and make transfers from the hot wallet, as wallet encryption was only in operation from the time of the Bitcoin 0.4.0 release on Sept 23rd 2011. Even as the wallets were being emptied, the employees at Mt Gox were apparently oblivious to what was taking place. It seems that Mt Gox workers were interpreting these withdrawals as large transfers being made to more secure wallets. The former CEO of the exchange, Mark Karpeles, is currently on trial for embezzlement and faces up to 5 years in prison if found guilty. The Mt Gox hack precipitated the acceleration of security improvements on other exchanges, for wallets, and the architecture of bitcoin itself. As a rule of thumb, no small-to-medium scale crypto holders should use exchange wallets as a long-term storage solution. Investors and experienced traders may do this to take advantage of market fluctuations, but exchange wallets are perhaps the most prone to hacking, and storing assets on exchanges for an extended time is one of the riskiest ways to hold your assets.
In a case strikingly similar to the MtGox of 2011–2014, the operators of the BitGrail exchange “discovered” that approximately 17 million XRB ($195 million worth in early 2018) were missing. The operators of the exchange were inexplicably still accepting deposits, long after they knew about the hack. Then they proceeded to block withdrawals from non-EU users. And then they even requested a hard fork of the code to restore the funds. This would have meant the entire XRB Blockchain would have had to accept all transactions from their first “invalid” transaction that were invalid, and rollback the ledger. The BitGrailexchange attempted to open operations in May 2018 but was immediately forced to close by order of the Italian courts. BitGrail did not institute mandatory KYC (Know your customer) procedures for their clients until after the theft had been reported, and allegedly months after the hack was visible. They also did not have 2 factor authentication mandatory for withdrawals. All big, and very costly mistakes.
Case Study: Good Practice Binance, the Attempted Hack
During the 2017 bull run, China-based exchange Binance quickly rose to the status of biggest altcoin exchange in the world, boasting daily volumes that surged to over $4 billion per day in late December. Unfortunately, this success attracted the attention of some crafty hackers. These hackers purchased domain names that were confusingly similar to “binance.com”. And then they created sufficiently convincing replica websites so they could phish traders for their login information. After obtaining this vital info, the scammers created API keys to place large buy orders for VIAcoin, an obscure, low volume digital currency. Those large buy orders spiked VIA’s price. Within minutes they traded the artificially high-priced VIA for BTC. Then they immediately made withdrawal requests from the hacked BTC wallets to wallets outside of the exchange. Almost a perfect fait accompli! But, Binance’s “automating risk management system” kicked in, as it should, and all withdrawals were temporarily suspended, resulting in a foiled hacking attempt.
Software Wallets Web/Desktop/Phone/Exchange Advantages and Limitations
As we said before, it is inadvisable to store crypto assets in exchange wallets, and, to a lesser extent, Web Wallets. The specific reason we say that is because you need to deliver your private keys into the hands of another party, and rely on that website or exchange to keep your private key, and thus your assets, safe. The advantages of the less-secure exchange or web wallets, are the speed at which you can transfer assets into another currency, or into another exchange for sale or for arbitrage purposes. Despite the convenience factor, all software wallets will at some point have been connected to the internet or a network. So, you can never be 100% sure that your system has not been infected with malware, or some kind of keylogging software, that will allow a third party to record your passwords or private keys. How well the type of storage method limits your contact with such hazards is a good way to rate the security of said variety of wallet. Of all the software wallets, desktop and mobile wallets are the most secure because you download and store your own private key, preferably on a different system. By taking the responsibility of private key storage you can be sure that only one person has possession of it, and that is you! Thereby greatly increasing the security of your crypto assets. By having their assets in a desktop wallet, traders can guard their private key and enjoy the associated heightened security levels, as well keep their assets just one swift transfer away from an exchange.
Hardware Wallets Advantages and Limitations
We briefly touched on the features and operation of the two most popular hardware wallets currently on the market, the Ledger and Trezor wallets. Now it will be helpful to take a closer look into the pros and cons of the hardware wallet storage method. With hardware wallets, the private keys are stored within a protected area of the microcontroller, and they are prevented from being exported out of the device in plain text. They are fortified with state-of-the-art cryptography that makes them immune to computer viruses and malware. And much of the time, the software is open source, which allows user validation of the entire performance of the device. The advantages of a hardware wallet over the perhaps more secure paper wallet method of crypto storage is the interactive user experience, and also the fact that the private key must at some stage be downloaded in order to use the paper wallet. The main disadvantage of a hardware wallet is the time-consuming extra steps needed to transfer funds out of this mode of storage to an exchange, which could conceivably result in some traders missing out on profits. But with security being the main concern of the vast majority of holders, investors and traders too, this slight drawback is largely inconsequential in most situations.
Paper Wallets Advantages and Limitations
Paper wallets are thought by some to be the safest way to store your crypto assets, or more specifically, the best method of guarding the pathways to your assets on the Blockchain. By printing out your private key information, the route to your assets on the Blockchain is stored 100% offline (apart from the act of printing the private key out, the entire process is totally offline). This means that you will not run the risk of being infected with malware or become the victim of keylogging scams. The main drawback of using paper wallets is that you are in effect putting all your eggs in one basket, and if the physical document is destroyed, you will lose access to your crypto assets forever.
Key things to keep in mind about your Wallet Security: Recovery Phrases/Private Key Storage/2FA/Email Security
Recovery phrases are used to recover the on-chain location for your wallet with your assets for hardware wallets like ledgers and Trezors that have been lost. When you purchase a new ledger for example, you just have to set it up again by entering the recovery phrase into the display and the lost wallets will appear with your assets intact. Private key storage is of paramount importance to maintain the safety of your on-chain assets! This should be done in paper wallet form, or stored offline on a different computer, or USB device, from the one you would typically use to connect to the 2 Factor Authentication (2FA) sometimes known as “two step authentication”. This feature offers an extra security layer when withdrawing funds from cryptocurrency wallets. A specialized app, most commonly Google Authenticator, is synced up to the exchange to provide a constantly changing code. This code must be entered within a short time window to initiate transfers, or to log into an exchange, if it has also been enabled for that purpose.
You must always consider the level of fees, or the amount of Gas, that will be needed to carry out the transaction. In times of high network activity Gas prices can be quite high. In fact, in December 2017 network fees became so high that some Bitcoin transactions became absolutely unfeasible. But that was basically due to the anomalous network congestion caused by frantic trading of Bitcoin as it was skyrocketing in value. When copying wallet addresses, double check and triple check that they are correct. If you make a mistake and enter an incorrect address, it is most likely your funds will be irretrievably lost; you will never see those particular assets again. Also check that you haven’t input the address of another one of your wallets that is designed to hold a different variety of cryptocurrency. You would similarly run the very great risk of losing your funds forever. Or, at the very least, if you have sent the wrong crypto to a large exchange wallet, for example on Coinbase, maybe you could eventually get those funds back, but it would still entail a long and unenjoyable wait.
How to Monitor Funds
There are two ways to monitor you funds and your wallets. The first is by searching for individual wallet addresses on websites specifically designed to let you view all the transactions on a particular Blockchain. The other is to store a copy of your wallet contents on an application that tracks the prices of all cryptocurrencies. Blockchain.info is the block explorer for Bitcoin, and it allows you to track all wallet movements so you can view your holdings and all the historical transactions within the wallet. The Ethereum blockchain’s block explorer is called Ether scanner, and it functions in the same way. There is a rival to Ether scanner produced by the Jibrel Network, called JSearch which will be released soon. JSearch will aim to offer a more streamlined and faster search method for Ethereum blockchain transactions. There are many different kinds of block explorer for each individual crypto currency, including nanoexplorer.io for Nano (formerly Rai Blocks) and Neotracker for NEO. If you simply want to view the value of your portfolio, the Delta and Blockfolio apps allow you to easily do that. But they are not actually linked to your specific wallet address, they just show price movements and total value of the coins you want to monitor.
That’s not all! You can learn how to transfer and monitor the funds in and out of your wallet by clicking on the link.
To be continued!
UBAI.co
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submitted by UBAI_UNIVERSITY to u/UBAI_UNIVERSITY [link] [comments]

Information and FAQ

Hi, for everyone looking for help and support for IOTA you have come to the right place. Please read this information, the FAQ and the side bar before asking for help.

Information

IOTA

IOTA is an open-source distributed ledger protocol launched in 2015 that goes 'beyond blockchain' through its core invention of the blockless ‘Tangle’. The IOTA Tangle is a quantum-resistant Directed Acyclic Graph (DAG), whose digital currency 'iota' has a fixed money supply with zero inflationary cost.
IOTA uniquely offers zero-fee transactions & no fixed limit on how many transactions can be confirmed per second. Scaling limitations have been removed, since throughput grows in conjunction with activity; the more activity, the more transactions can be processed & the faster the network. Further, unlike blockchain architecture, IOTA has no separation between users and validators (miners / stakers); rather, validation is an intrinsic property of using the ledger, thus avoiding centralization.
IOTA is focused on being useful for the emerging machine-to-machine (m2m) economy of the Internet-of-Things (IoT), data integrity, micro-/nano- payments, and other applications where a scalable decentralized system is warranted.
More information can be found here.

Non reusable addresses

Contrary to traditional blockchain based systems such as Bitcoin, where your wallet addresses can be reused, IOTA's addresses should only be used once (for outgoing transfers). That means there is no limit to the number of transactions an address can receive, but as soon as you've used funds from that address to make a transaction, this address should not be used anymore.
The reason for this is, by making an outgoing transaction a part of the private key of that specific address is revealed, and it opens the possibility that someone may brute force the full private key to gain access to all funds on that address. The more outgoing transactions you make from the same address, the easier it will be to brute force the private key.
It should be noted that having access to the private key of an address will not reveal your seed or the private key of the other addresses within your seed / "account".
This piggy bank diagram can help visualize non reusable addresses. imgur link

Address Index

When a new address is generated it is calculated from the combination of a seed + Address Index, where the Address Index can be any positive Integer (including "0"). The wallet usually starts from Address Index 0, but it will skip any Address Index where it sees that the corresponding address has already been attached to the tangle.

Private Keys

Private keys are derived from a seeds key index. From that private key you then generate an address. The key index starting at 0, can be incremented to get a new private key, and thus address.
It is important to keep in mind that all security-sensitive functions are implemented client side. What this means is that you can generate private keys and addresses securely in the browser, or on an offline computer. All libraries provide this functionality.
IOTA uses winternitz one-time signatures, as such you should ensure that you know which private key (and which address) has already been used in order to not reuse it. Subsequently reusing private keys can lead to the loss of funds (an attacker is able to forge the signature after continuous reuse).
Exchanges are advised to store seeds, not private keys.

Double spending

Sending a transaction will move your entire balance to a completely new address, if you have more than one pending transaction only one can eventually be confirmed and the resulting balance is sent to your next wallet address. This means that the other pending transactions are now sent from an address that has a balance of 0 IOTA, and thus none of these pending transactions can ever be confirmed.

Transaction Process

As previously mentioned, in IOTA there are no miners. As such the process of making a transaction is different from any Blockchain out there today. The process in IOTA looks as follows:
  • Signing: You sign the transaction inputs with your private keys. This can be done offline.
  • Tip Selection: MCMC is used to randomly select two tips, which will be referenced by your transaction (branchTransaction and trunkTransaction)
  • Proof of Work: In order to have your transaction accepted by the network, you need to do some Proof of Work - similar to Hashcash, not Bitcoin (spam and sybil-resistance). This usually takes a few minutes on a modern pc.
After this is completed, the trunkTransaction, branchTransaction and nonce of the transaction object should be updated. This means that you can broadcast the transaction to the network now and wait for it to be approved by someone else.

FAQ

How do I to buy IOTA?

Currently not all exchanges support IOTA and those that do may not support the option to buy with fiat currencies.
One way to buy IOTA is to buy with bitcoin (BTC) or Ether (ETH), first you will need to deposit BTC/ETH onto an exchange wallet and you can the exchange them for IOTA.
You can buy BTC or ETH through coinbase. And exchange those for IOTA on Binance or Bitfinex (other exchanges do exist, some linked in the side bar).
A detailed guide to buying can be found here.

What is MIOTA?

MIOTA is a unit of IOTA, 1 Mega IOTA or 1 Mi. It is equivalent to 1,000,000 IOTA and is the unit which is currently exchanged.
We can use the metric prefixes when describing IOTA e.g 2,500,000,000 i is equivalent to 2.5 Gi.
Note: some exchanges will display IOTA when they mean MIOTA.

Can I mine IOTA?

No you can not mine IOTA, all the supply of IOTA exist now and no more can be made.
If you want to send IOTA, your 'fee' is you have to verify 2 other transactions, thereby acting like a minenode.

Where should I store IOTA?

It is not recommended to store large amounts of IOTA on the exchange as you will not have access to the private keys of the addresses generated.
However many people have faced problems with the current GUI Wallet and therefore group consensus at the moment is to store your IOTA on the exchange, until the release of the UCL Wallet, or the Paper Wallet.

What is the GUI wallet?

What is the UCL Wallet?

What is a seed?

A seed is a unique identifier that can be described as a combined username and password that grants you access to your wallet.
Your seed is used to generate the addresses linked to your account and so this should be kept private and not shared with anyone. If anyone obtains your seed, they can login and access your IOTA.

How do I generate a seed?

You must generate a random 81 character seed using only A-Z and the number 9.
It is recommended to use offline methods to generate a seed, and not recommended to use any non community verified techniques. To generate a seed you could:

On a Linux Terminal use the following command:

 cat /dev/urandom |tr -dc A-Z9|head -c${1:-81} 

On a Mac Terminal use the following command:

 cat /dev/urandom |LC_ALL=C tr -dc 'A-Z9' | fold -w 81 | head -n 1 

With KeePass on PC

A helpful guide for generating a secure seed on KeePass can be found here.

With a dice

Dice roll template

Is my seed secure?

  1. All seeds should be 81 characters in random order composed of A-Z and 9.
  2. Do not give your seed to anyone, and don’t keep it saved in a plain text document.
  3. Don’t input your seed into any websites that you don’t trust.
Is this safe? Can’t anyone guess my seed?
What are the odds of someone guessing your seed?
  • IOTA seed = 81 characters long, and you can use A-Z, 9
  • Giving 2781 = 8.7x10115 possible combinations for IOTA seeds
  • Now let's say you have a "super computer" letting you generate and read every address associated with 1 trillion different seeds per second.
  • 8.7x10115 seeds / 1x1012 generated per second = 8.7x10103 seconds = 2.8x1096 years to process all IOTA seeds.

Why does balance appear to be 0 after a snapshot?

When a snapshot happens, all transactions are being deleted from the Tangle, leaving only the record of how many IOTA are owned by each address. However, the next time the wallet scans the Tangle to look for used addresses, the transactions will be gone because of the snapshot and the wallet will not know anymore that an address belongs to it. This is the reason for the need to regenerate addresses, so that the wallet can check the balance of each address. The more transactions were made before a snapshot, the further away the balance moves from address index 0 and the more addresses have to be (re-) generated after the snapshot.

Why is my transaction pending?

IOTA's current Tangle implementation (IOTA is in constant development, so this may change in the future) has a confirmation rate that is ~66% at first attempt.
So, if a transaction does not confirm within 1 hour, it is necessary to "reattach" (also known as "replay") the transaction one time. Doing so one time increases probability of confirmation from ~66% to ~89%.
Repeating the process a second time increases the probability from ~89% to ~99.9%.

What does attach to the tangle mean?

The process of making an transaction can be divided into two main steps:
  1. The local signing of a transaction, for which your seed is required.
  2. Taking the prepared transaction data, choosing two transactions from the tangle and doing the POW. This step is also called “attaching”.
The following analogy makes it easier to understand:
Step one is like writing a letter. You take a piece of paper, write some information on it, sign it at the bottom with your signature to authenticate that it was indeed you who wrote it, put it in an envelope and then write the recipient's address on it.
Step two: In order to attach our “letter” (transaction), we go to the tangle, pick randomly two of the newest “letters” and tie a connection between our “letter” and each of the “letters” we choose to reference.
The “Attach address” function in the wallet is actually doing nothing else than making an 0 value transaction to the address that is being attached.

How do I reattach a transaction.

Reattaching a transaction is different depending on where you send your transaction from. To reattach using the GUI Desktop wallet follow these steps:
  1. Click 'History'.
  2. Click 'Show Bundle' on the 'pending' transaction.
  3. Click 'Reattach'.
  4. Click 'Rebroadcast'. (optional, usually not required)
  5. Wait 1 Hour.
  6. If still 'pending', repeat steps 1-5 once more.

What happens to pending transactions after a snapshot?

How do I recover from a long term pending transaction?

How can I support IOTA?

You can support the IOTA network by setting up a Full Node, this will help secure the network by validating transactions broadcast by other nodes.
Running a full node also means you don't have to trust a 3rd party in showing you the correct balance and transaction history of your wallet.
By running a full node you get to take advantage of new features that might not be installed on 3rd party nodes.

How to set up a full node?

To set up a full node you will need to follow these steps:
  1. Download the full node software: either GUI, or headless CLI for lower system requirements and better performance.
  2. Get a static IP for your node.
  3. Join the network by adding 7-9 neighbours.
  4. Keep your full node up and running as much as possible.
A detailed user guide on how to set up a VTS IOTA Full Node from scratch can be found here.

How do I get a static IP?

To learn how to setup a hostname (~static IP) so you can use the newest IOTA versions that have no automated peer discovery please follow this guide.

How do I find a neighbour?

Are you a single IOTA full node looking for a partner? You can look for partners in these place:

Extras

Transaction Example:

Multiple Address in 1 Wallet Explained:

submitted by Boltzmanns_Constant to IOTASupport [link] [comments]

BDXAlliance FAQs

How do I reset my password?
To reset your account password please click on the ‘’Forgot Password’’ option on the BDXAlliance website and once you access your account you could change it to a personalised one through ‘’Change Password’’ on the left of the page.

How do I receive benefits?
In order to receive benefits of all our partner ICOs you will need an ERC20 compatible wallet, ready for when we launch our BDXAlliance ecosystem. The wallet address will have to be added to your BDX account — once this is setup, you will be receiving the benefits upon every distribution. To find out when the next token distribution is, please join our Telegram group and place your question there: - English Telegram Group - German Telegram Group

How do I register my ETH Wallet and how do I add it in the account?
To add an Ethereum Wallet to your account you first need to create one online -- please make sure you are creating/using an ERC20 compatible wallet (such as TrustWalletApp, MyEtherWallet, etc) NOT an exchange wallet (such as Binance or Coinbase) Once you create your Wallet please Log into HERE and click on ‘’Wallet’’ on the top left of the page > ‘’ETH Wallet Address’’ copy-paste the wallet address.

Is there a list of ETH wallets supported/not supported?
Every ERC20 compatible wallet is supported, please do your research to be able to chose one that you find the most convenient for your needs.

When can I withdraw from my account?
Our clients can withdraw from their BDX account after the ICO is over and the coin is listed on exchanges.

I was promised the ICO would launch in mid 2018 and it didn’t. Why?
We are professionals in our field. In order to get to where we are now we needed to address some issues within our infrastructure to be able to offer you, the customer, the best product that we could possibly give you. Along with a new CEO, branding and whitepaper, we feel we are better placed to give you everything that BDXAlliance has to offer.

Are these rewards meant to be other tokens of ICO partners you launch or the increased value of BDXCoin itself? Or both?
Each BDXCoin holder will be rewarded directly with Tokens of our ICO partners. The airdrop will be sent right to the BDXCoin holders ERC20 compatible wallet.

Can I add my Coinbase or other exchange wallet to my BDX account?
Please make sure you are using an ERC20 compatible wallet (such as TrustWalletApp, MyEtherWallet, etc) NOT an exchange wallet (such as Binance or Coinbase) to access our ecosystem.

When can I trade my coins?
You are able to trade your coins after the ICO launch phase has ended and BDXChange has launched.

Are you connected to BDSwiss?
BDSwiss are our cousins in fintech, they’re our family and operate differently within the financial landscape.

Is there more information on the company?
You can find out more about us by reading the About Us section of our website, reading our Whitepaper or by talking to us in our Telegram groups: - English Telegram Group - German Telegram Group

Can I use my credit card for your services?
Yes.

Can I use my debit card for your services?
Yes.

What is the buyback guarantee?
Buyers who purchased BDXCoins in the period December 17th 2017 - March 20th 2018 inclusive, are, if they wish, entitled to a money back guarantee of 0.10 Euro cents per token purchased. If the ICO does not start until the 31.12.2018 the token purchasers can get a reimbursement of equivalent value of €0.10 (Bitcoin) and the token purchase agreement with be declared void by the parties.

For more info visit our website: www.bdxalliance.com
submitted by EhMoik to BDXAlliance [link] [comments]

New To Cryptocurrency

Well thats pretty much it. I have really no idea what I am doing. That said, I have dome some research and attempted to get started. I have a few wallets as of now, some or most still waiting verification. I have setup at epay, paxful, cryptopay, binance, coinbase, and blockchain as of yet.
I have an interest in some alt coins vs bitcoin but I assume more research in time will determine where I invest and start my new business. I have a little understanding on mining and the hardware used, I am aware of GDAX and some crytpos now being traded on the stock exchange. I see the trend in an upward direction and the IRS is now taking note, the new tax bill has some provisions regarding crypto trading, etc... So I feel it is really happening and the decentalization of money, fiat... is a good thing and a must needed step we have to take if we wish to continue our process of evolution.
I have some questions though: I cannot use my debit card for coinbase because it determines it as a prepaid debit card. Now one is just that, a prepaid visa, I put a small amount of money on it just to get started. The other debit I have is from the federal government. It is an account I can wire from but I cannot wire to. It is not a prepaid account but coinbase determines it as such. I would like to find a way around this. Even though I see the fees and such with CB I still feel I want to get some expereince in with that interface. Im also aware that you can instead of using CB to buy btc, you can use GDAX.
I like the looks of GDAX... and after getting my account made and verified with CB, I went to GDAX to login. I had to authorize my computer to login, and thus after I was given a notice on the login screen claiming my account was temperarily locked and that I had to seek [email protected]. So I went thru that process and after filing for request I received the confirmation of request and now I am waiting for them to get back to me. I used my android to make the CB account. Used a computer to use GDAX, did receive the successful authorization notice and reloaded page to login but was shutout. I know I can purchase btc from GDAX but not sure if my debit cards will work there, as with the issue with CB?
I have similar isses with the other "vendors" or are they simply "brokers" ie broker and wallet...
The paxful and blockchain wallets are up okay but I cannot figure out how to jsut buy btc at the going value noted on coinmarketcap. It seems like, I have to buy btc from a seller, and there are fees from them, and or a third party software or wallet, or broker... and I then can give my wallet address for the deposit. I get the very basic idea here? I had to send in my id, my pasport, my ss number, dob... lol address... these are crucial idenfying factors... I thought this crypto was meant to be anonmyous? What do I not understand? I have read some guides and watched tons of videos but don't think I am understanding it, now that I have a direct intention, or goal, idea, on how I want to use crypto, and that maybe the issue among other things?
paxful for example. is a p2p trade platform, if my assumptions are correct. There, you can buy with debit, or credit, or a direct bank transfer, etc... even some with gift cards, but the small details kinda concern me. I had to get authorized and validated with paxful... but why then do i need to send a pic of my id, passport, write a note, and have the card in hand all in a selfie... if I had verified with the broker? Am I correct to consider paxful the broker in this case? the seller, the individual, is also charging a going rate on top of the actual value of the btc... so Im getting the feeling like, identity scam, theft, AND you loose money in the transfer... lol from usd to btc. At least having the risk of the theft and scam of my ID is enough to close the window and laugh out loud and think just a second, from an idiots perspective, this is no where near anonmyous, no where near safe... what the hell is this shit? I have to buy at one place, then exchange, then I can trade on a different platform, I need to have a hardware wallet so I dont get hacked... I mean ... this seems like a lot to take in all at once and I wish it didnt seem so risky.
There seems to lack a one stop shop for common deals... I just want to walk up to an atm, put in cash and get a receipt with a number or code I can scan and it be added to my wallet, via hardware or software or online... I plan on using online or software with the very little money I decided to invest with at the moment but will be getting a hardware wallet once I understand better what is going on. Also, seems to be a lot of opinions on youtube etc... about likes and dislikes... and it really hurts prospective noobs who needs only the facts and the details so we can make a better choice starting out. I don't mean to be a critic here and not offer something in response that could help, I just don't yet understand this and I have decided to go in, but I really need a GREAT source of information for research, like videos for specific trades, sources, and means.
I'm already discouraged, I set up several wallets, or what I thought was a broker to buy btc and trade on, but there are tons of limitations or transfers I have to do... and now all these companies have my sensitive information. I understand this is all a learning experience and I am not freaking out, :) I just need a little hand holding maybe for a few issues I have atm and once I get past that, I think all will be nice.
I really like GDAX, and want to buy from there, but can I use debit... prepaid debit, and if not, where then can I just pay with prepaid debit straight to btc, and I am okay with then moving it to a waller like blockchain or binance.
Im constantly looking for help with the basics, but am flooded with opinions on which is best to trade, and everyone saying HOW EASY IT IS TO BUY BTC ... okay, maybe true but there are tons of limits or redtape, or even fees... and with the sensitive info. it all just makes it a lil discouraging. Could use some help please. I would really appreciate it. Thanks.
PS - just to note. The new tax laws... yea wtf... I think now maybe crypto may be such the risk its just not worth my identity and the problems with the irs... I have to report and track all transactions... is this why everyone needs my id cards pictures and selfie with me holding it, or whatnot? seems like a great way to get fucked over... for a few bucks.
Looks like, crypto is dead. no anonimity, I have to pay all these fees, I now have to pay tax on EVERY SINGLE transaction... so its looking like its too late. and If I invest now, its just trouble.
Now maybe a new trype of crypto will come out that will be of a different operation, name and function, so that IRS has to make new law for that, ... so that its not considered a crypto currency, because crypto, imho being the moron here, looks like it was targered and its initiative is lost. they did this to kill it. the US dollar is dominate, though I dont think its really is, and eventually it will fall, by design it is not sustainable. I want out... but IDK how to get in to the new without being a target by the IRS, and or having to play by their rules. we want out and the dollar will collaspe, I feel rather concerned and desperate tbh... its kinda scary. fuck the irs. and fuck you wallstreet. i wouldnt mind if you all made out big but with 9/11 and all that insider trading and the wars and wars, and wars,... the collasping of the housing economy... lol youre not even taking care of your own, how the fuck do you expect to survive much longer? its actually comical, retarded at best. if at least you groomed your front yard, maybe america could be great again.
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How To Buy From Coinbase And Send To Binance How to transfer Litecoin or Bitcoin from Coinbase to Binance Coinbase - How to Find your Bitcoin wallet address - YouTube Withdrawal Address Whitelist Tutorial Deposting Bitcoin to Your Binance Wallet Address How to Copy Bitcoin Wallet Address // Coinbase account ... How to move profits from binance back to Coinbase(GDAX)

Coinbase Wallet. FAQ; Get it now; The secure app to store crypto yourself. All your digital assets in one place Use Decentralized Apps Pay friends, not addresses All your digital assets in one place. Take full control of your tokens and collectibles by storing them on your own device. Multi-Coin Support . Manage BTC, BCH, ETH, ETC, LTC, and all your ERC-20 tokens. Digital collectibles. Cats ... Go to Coinbase: Login to your Coinbase account and click on Accounts. Next, click on Send where it says ETH Wallet. You’ll be asked to enter a Recipient. This is where the Ethereum will be sent. You’re sending it to Binance, so you need to get an Ethereum address from your Binance account. 2. Login to your Binance account. Visit https://www.binance.com and Log in to the Binance account. 2. After the login, click on [Wallet] - [Spot Wallet ]on the upper right-hand side of the page. Then, click on [Withdraw] button on the right banner. 3. Input the abbreviation or full name of a coin/token to withdraw, or select from the list. Coinbase is a secure platform that makes it easy to buy, sell, and store cryptocurrency like Bitcoin, Ethereum, and more. Based in the USA, Coinbase is available in over 30 countries worldwide. How do I protect against losing access to my funds? Coinbase Wallet is a user-controlled, non-custodial product. The app generates a 12 word recovery phrase which is what gives you, and only you, access to your account to move received funds. Coinbase will never have access to this seed, meaning that we cannot move funds on your behalf even if you lose access to your recovery phrase. We built ... Withdrawal Address Whitelist. What is a withdrawal whitelist? Why is it important for the security of your assets? Learn how to set up a withdrawal whitelist and how it can benefit you. View More » Anti-Phishing Code Guide. What is an anti-phishing code? How can it protect your from phishing? Learn about Binance's anti-phishing code security feature in this video. View More » How to Deposit ... Where is my Coinbase crypto address? Triple check your unique crypto address to make sure you're sharing the correct asset address. Sending and receiving unsupported assets through Wallet can cause you to lose them. Find out which assets are supported. You can find your unique crypto addresses from your computer or the Coinbase mobile app. Computer. Sign into your coinbase account; Go to ... Coinbase is a secure online platform for buying, selling, transferring, and storing digital currency. Login to Coinbase. You’re bringing money from Binance to here, so first, we need to know where the money or cryptocurrency is going to land. Access your wallet on Coinbase, and from there, you’ll be given an address code to use when transferring funds. All you have to do is click on your wallet to open up a menu of adding money, and you’ll be met with a screen that has all the necessary ... Your BTC address is a string of 26-35 letters and numbers that identify your Bitcoin wallet. BTC addresses begin with either a 1 or a 3 and are case-sensitive. When you want to receive funds, this is the information that you provide to the person paying you. Your BTC address is oftentimes called your wallet address or your public address.

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How To Buy From Coinbase And Send To Binance

Enjoy the videos and music you love, upload original content, and share it all with friends, family, and the world on YouTube. In this video: Deposting Bitcoin to Your Binance Wallet Address. We go step by step and deposit Bitcoin to Binance Wallet Address. How to fund binance account. How to transfer Litecoin from Coinbase to Binance Check out my no.1 recommended platform to invest in Bitcoin instantly with ZERO fees: https://coinjolt.com ... If you want to someone to send you money to your Bitcoin account, Give them this address. you may donate to our network via Bitcoin as well :) Bitcoin addres... Learn how to protect your cryptocurrency by enabling the withdrawal address whitelist feature on Binance Exchange. Keep your crypto safe! Subscribe to keep u... How to buy from Coinbase and send cryptocurrency over to Binance Any more questions feel free to comment or message me. Please Like/ Subscribe. Thanks. Wanna Donate to help my channel? Bitcoin ... You will be withdrawing your money from Binance to GDAX then into your bank account. This question pops up alot in my videos so hopefully this will explain everything as this does, and can get ...

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